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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the political cliche of low-hanging fruit is something so cartoon h cartoonishly insensitive, so cartoonishly villainous, you then bring upon us a second political cliche. you have jumped the shark. blocking voluntary efforts by people to get rid of their own guns because they want to voluntarily? that is an exercise in shark jumping. this is the sort of thing that might make sense internally to the nra when they talk about this amongsts, but the rest of the the country are not picking a fight, but looking for problem solving, nonconfrontational ways to help each other out. trying to block the voluntary tucson gun buy-back program does not make sense. the whole reason gun policy is supposed to be seen as so intractable, so unreformable, so politically untouchable and not in america is that the national rifle association has created a mystique about themselves, a mystique about their own power that is supposed to caution anyone who might want to reform gun laws that it just cannot be done. no matter who we are, no matter where we live, no matter how or why we might want to reform our gun laws,
to get out? >> that's the cliche. they are already getting in. we have to answer whether it is a good idea. i think it is one of the best places for yield if you can't get into real estate. but the bottom line is this. tyler, i met new summer of 2007 when the vix was last this low and i remember doing dow 14,000 stories in the fall. and i remember what happened after that. now i'm not saying cliches are always true, but that's the cautionary tale and that's what i saw five years ago. >> 2007. wow. time goes o by. did you hear this, lance armstrong admitted to oprah winfrey he used peds and cheated his way to seven tour de france titles. will this admission, brian, help restore his brand? of course, this is a steroid-free and hormone-free hour at "power lunch." >> yes. as can you tell, my pipes aren't quite what they used to be. his brand, according to the people i talked to, is pretty much destroyed. was not helped by last night. i talked to one sports agent who represent olympic athletes and he said, no way will he ever make another dollar off himself but said every office he goes in
to hold, it is central casting cliche downgrades. i suspect you will be hearing one of them tomorrow about lennar, the great home builder no doubt because of stretch valuations. lack of catalyst. don't be surprised when they tell us the same thing in the end about facebook. it turned out to be as powerful as blockbuster video? repeat after me, stretch valuations and no catalysts. maybe they were waiting to get kicked to the curb. maybe something else at work that can make us some money. first, let me just say that this market has been nothing short of remarkable. apple, bad estimate cut. this stock seems to cut the heart out of this market every day. like the weird guy in "temple of doom." it is getting ugly out there. and it is so bad on twitter some holders are blaming my daughter for not liking the new itunes. we had horrendous headlines of a total government shutdown. still, it may lead to a downgrade in us debt. we are being told that the debt ceiling wrangling could be even worse for the country than going over the fiscal cliff. how is that for frightening? senator freddy krueger ver
.s. could do. >> oh, and this latest decision to just kick the can, i hate to use the cliche, further down the road, axel neighbor is a former central banker in europe, also the head of ubs and he was absolutely in no doubt that what we are seeing in the u.s. in the political and economic process is dangerous. >> if you have the debt ceiling, the europeans will talk about how you can make that binding. in the u.s., the concern is much more whether you can lift it in time in order not to put too much break on the economy. now, the u.s. economy has bottomed out, it's coming back, and i think sooner or later the u.s. has to face the fiscal issue not just in the sense of delaying adjustment but really making a credible adjustment. >> this is very reminiscent of the conversations we were having a year ago about europe. from the outside it looked obvious, have to get your house in order, you know what the decisions are likely to be, you have to just do them. now i hear everybody in europe saying you know what you need to do, you just need to do it. >> they were particularly amaze t at the latest
and keeping their powder dry if i can cram some cliches in there. it's unusual to do an interview when you're awaiting confirmation. you're supposed to do an immediate blackout. he chose his hometown newspaper to do it. while do we care about this as a political story, will he be confirmed or not? everybody thinks in the end he will be. senator schumer is key here. a democratic nominee who doesn't have a scandal or personal scandal, all about policy, very rare to beat somebody just on policy, particularly if it stays an inside game. are there people in washington, in elite circles who want to stop hagel? absolutely. is the public engage on this? no way, not now. the challenge for the people who oppose is to do one of two things, either get the public engaged and say we want to stop chuck hagel, unlikely or pick off a prominent democratic senator who says i can't support this person. schumer is the key. if schumer supports hagel, almost impossible to stop him. >> i have to say, not to -- i feel like this is all - all -- especially the extreme opposition here, it's kind of a waste of time. t
. if that pipeline is built, it means a huge new source of emissions out into the foreseeable future. the cliche about second presidential terms, one which i think a good deal of truth to it, is that in the second term a president's attention turns to leaving a legacy. and i am almost certain that 50 or 100 years from now the only issue that will really matter to people is what we did about the climate. right now i'm joined by phaedra ellis-lamkin, green for all. paul bledsoe, clinton white house climate change task force. francis beinecke, president of national resources defense council and ta-nehisi coates. good morning. >> good morning. >> i was surprised about that speech. were you? >> surprised and excited. we were hoping to get the president's commitment. he made it very strongly. this was not a one line or two words climate change. eight sentences, policy, commitment. >> you're counting the sentences there, that's -- >> we're no longer counting the words. that's progress. counting the words for four years, now we're onto -- i think it was a very bold commitment on his part. if you were th
events, even though the audiences are dropping. so you've heard the cliche about analog dollars and digital dimes, now mobile pennies. as more and more of the eyeballs and the audience is going to mobile, the ability to monetize it becomes even more challenging. so facebook and google and a lot of companies have really a great mobile strategy. i'm not sure that the true big dollars are going to be there -- >> they've got to be there at some point, don't they? if that's the way people are digesting content? >> i don't know if you're going to be able to monetize it to the same degree that you were able to monetize it in the old business. >> what does that mean? >> i think what it means is it's a great time to be a consumer. the consumers will have more choices to get their content than they ever had before. they'll have a ball. the question is, even the content owners. it's not quite as easy to just say, well, gee, i have this content and i can then sell it across all of these platforms. you know? the people who are the big winners are the nfl, you know, people like that. what the
cliche, but i was seeing a lot of it. and in our game, you know, and you've been around me long enough to know, i want our guys to care about each other fiercely. that's why the '04 team worked so well. we didn't have a ton of rules. but when the game started, they knew what they were doing and they cared about each other. and i saw stuff that i didn't think gave saw stuff that i did think gave us their best chance to win and i wanted to tell them that. and i walked back to my office, and said, they didn't grasp it, they didn't listen. they were just wondering why i had a meeting. >> this book calls mike barnicle a boston multi-media personality. that's questionable. >> we had to give him some liberty. >> so there are great baseball fans all over the country, but boston is special. red sox nation is different. what are the fans like? what is the pressure like for a manager in boston that's not like any place else? >> if you like baseball, it's an unbelievable place to work. there's passion, there's interest. along with that comes a headache every once in a while. because there's no lit
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)